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But employers are required to limit contribu��tions by highly compensated employees if an insufficient number of lower-paid employees participate in the plan. (For 2014, you���re a highly compensated employee if you earn $115,000 or more.) And you can���t contribute to a Roth IRA if you earn more than $129,000 in 2014 ($191,000 for married couples filing jointly), although there���s no income limit if you make after-tax contributions to a traditional IRA and convert it to a Roth.

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Lukas White (front),10, put the pole that held a note and cash back into place as he and his family Jeff White (left), and brothers Jordan White, 9, and Kaleb White, 7, showed where they found the hidden cash near the 18th hole of the Shawnee Mission Park Disc Golf Course on Wednesday, June 4, 2014, in Lenexa, Kansas. The White's walked away with $20 of the $36 after splitting the money with two other people who were in the area around the same time. SHANE KEYSER Kansas City Star

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Taxable accounts. Investing some of your savings in a taxable account is an especially good idea if you���re saving for both retirement and college. If you come up short while your child is in college, you can tap your taxable account without paying income taxes and early-withdrawal penalties.

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Taxes on these accounts aren���t deferred, but most investors pay just 15% on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends; investors in the 10% and 15% tax brackets pay 0%. Meanwhile, withdrawals from your tax-deferred accounts will be taxed at your ordinary income rate, which currently ranges from 10% to 39.6%.

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Read more at http://www.kiplinger.com/article/investing/T047-C000-S002-where-to-save-after-maxing-out-your-401-k.html#EZGsK2sD6YUOUw52.99

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